Pilgrimage On Shikoku Island

Online forum for discussions related to the 88 temple pilgrimage on Shikoku, Japan.


    walking poles -vs- single pole

    Share

    Shikoku Henro Trail
    Admin

    Posts : 213
    Join date : 2018-04-12
    Location : Chicago, USA

    walking poles -vs- single pole

    Post by Shikoku Henro Trail on Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:25 am

    Originally posted between February and July 2011.
    -----

    jo3edc

    « Thread started on: Feb 23rd, 2011, 3:37pm »
    I know that there is nothing prescriptive about what one wears on the trail - however ... I have normally walked long distances with walking poles. If I walk with a single pole I know it is correct and the pole represents Kobi - is there some way I can show that my heart is in the right place (and that I am not totally ignorant of the correct way) and still take the 2 poles?
    Jo
    42 sleeps to go to pilgrimage

    =====

    robmix

    « Reply #1 on: Feb 24th, 2011, 8:41pm »
    I saw a couple people walking with two poles, and actually I walked without one. . . actually I started the walk with one but it was stolen/borrowed at temple 3. So I continued without it thinking it must be a sign smiley

    A few people asked about my lack of a pole, but most didn't care. The rules seems pretty flexible. Have an incredible trip !!!!!!

    =====

    jo3edc

    « Reply #2 on: Feb 24th, 2011, 10:33pm »
    Thank you - maybe I can put "something" on the poles - cover up their brand name and put on "Kobi" smiley
    Jp

    =====

    robmix

    « Reply #3 on: Feb 25th, 2011, 1:47pm »
    The other thing to consider is the hassle of poles or a pole. I was completely unencumbered when walking. That was definitely a blessing. . .

    =====

    Shikoku Henro Trail

    « Reply #4 on: Feb 26th, 2011, 10:33am »
    It is rare, but i also see people with no poles from time to time and no one seems to give any notice. They may ask, but it is out of curiosity and doesn't seem to have any judgment involved. I can't imagine walking with no pole at all, but whether it is one or two, whether it is the official kongotsue or two alpine walking poles.... it just doesn't seem to matter.

    If you want to make yours official, get a Sharpie and write "Namu Daishi Henjo Kongo" on them and you're all set.

    =====

    dukkha

    « Reply #5 on: Feb 26th, 2011, 8:08pm »
    when i walked in oct-nov last year I met a french canadian using 2 walking poles..mind you she looked more like a backpacker than pilgrim. Also met an older Japanese guy who had 2 poles and covered the handles with the traditional henro walking stick covers. I bought the standard no frills stick from temple 1, and preceded to add bells, cords n stuff as I progressed..kinda make your own as you walk thing. I forgot it outside a shop near temple 62 I think. I was fatigued at the time..then near 71 I walked out of a toilet and there was one perfect bamboo stick just waiting for me..a sign perhaps. Anyway important practical reasons for having sticks...mamushi snakes..gees I came across too many of these, and stick was good for pushing them aside, good as spider web catchers and I guess 2 poles would be good for this, and something I learnt the hard way...keep a bell on your stick or pack. Why? Theres inoshishi or wild pigs in many places and the bell warns them youre coming. I found out the hard way as I lost my bell near 81, and when I was walking that remote rural road up to 88 with no bell I stumbled across pack of inoshisi...thats a story for another day.

    =====

    robmix

    « Reply #6 on: Feb 26th, 2011, 10:11pm »
    You saw all the cool stuff Smile

    I saw lots of snakes, but no mumashi, and no wild pigs. . . .

    =====

    dukkha

    « Reply #7 on: Feb 27th, 2011, 01:54am »
    on Feb 26th, 2011, 10:11pm, robmix wrote:
    You saw all the cool stuff Smile

    I saw lots of snakes, but no mumashi, and no wild pigs. . . .



    Hi Robmix...maybe I'm naieve but I kinda thought lots of stuff happened to those that venture solo on the path. I tell ya after I met those wild pigs I was on paranoid footing..I was coming down the final steps to temple 88, when i heard some noises..i crept round the corner in battle ready pose with my staff, only to confront a japanese henro sweeping the path with a branch...he said he was sweeping to delay reaching the final temple...I nearly wept as I felt the same..anyway the first thing he said when he saw me in attack mode was....you saw the pigs didn't you...freaky stuff. For me this experience kinda topped it off..not a day went by without some bizarre stuff happening..the final walk to temple 88 was the icing on the cake.

    dukkha Smile

    =====

    jo3edc

    « Reply #8 on: Feb 27th, 2011, 02:32am »
    If you want to make yours official, get a Sharpie and write "Namu Daishi Henjo Kongo" on them and you're all set.
    I like this idea - what is a sharpie -a whiteboard marker? and what does Namu Daishi Henjo Kongo mean. Thank you for this idea - it is very good Smile

    =====

    jo3edc

    « Reply #9 on: Feb 27th, 2011, 02:35am »
    2 poles and covered the handles with the traditional henro walking stick covers.
    What is this cover and will I be able to buy it at the first temple?
    jo

    40/42 sleeps to go Smile

    =====

    Shikoku Henro Trail

    « Reply #10 on: Feb 27th, 2011, 3:53pm »
    Namu Daishi Henjo Kongo means, roughly "Homage to the savior Daishi, the illuminating and imperishable one."

    You can see the kanji on the 'what to do at the temples' page of the web site. (www.shikokuhenrotrail.com/shikoku/walkingWhatToDo.html)

    While on the trail you will see this phrase on the official kongotsue, on the back of some people's hakui, and a billion times at every temple. The phrase is everywhere.

    A sharpie is just the brand name of a popular permanent marker here in the US. You'll want a permanent marker because you will be walking in rain from time to time.

    =====

    Shikoku Henro Trail

    « Reply #11 on: Feb 27th, 2011, 3:55pm »
    That's interesting about the inoshishi --- i don't remember ever meeting any. I've run across troops of monkeys many, many times, almost always on the way up to one of the bangai. And let me tell you, when there's dozens of them, the encounter always got my heart racing. I didn't run, but i certainly didn't take my time getting out of the area.

    =====

    dukkha

    « Reply #12 on: Mar 1st, 2011, 02:31am »
    wow I only saw one big angry male monkey between temples 12 and 13. The aftermath of inoshishi were in many places when I walked, and the news spoke of a war with them as they were destroying crops. Usually nocturnal, hence one reason why you shouldn't walk at night as they can get big and are usually in groups. Problem Shikoku farmers have is theyve bred with escaped domestic pigs...enter the new improved inoshishi..ventures into daylight, and can have larger litters - wild inoshishi usually have 1-2 offspring at a time. So the farmers told me. Longer summers, crops going off, and more feral pigs means a struggle for resources...a henro told me thats why the monkey we saw didnt look happy...also told me not to look into monkeys eyes cause it can provoke em...anyway will stop my rambling, but it makes for great adventure.

    =====

    Lisa

    « Reply #13 on: Jun 25th, 2011, 03:46am »
    This is for dukkha who wrote:
    "when i walked in oct-nov last year"

    Hi, I am planning to do the 88 temple pilgrimage in oct/nov this year. How was the weather last year in oct/nov? How much rain did you have? Did you take full rain gear or waterproof shoes?

    Lots of questions, I know... thanks for taking the time to read them!

    =====

    dukkha

    « Reply #14 on: Jul 2nd, 2011, 12:26am »
    Hi Lisa, the weather was really warm from a mid-coast Australians point of view..at least for the first 2 weeks, especially going down the Kochi coast. Seemed a lot warmer than when I lived in Japan 20yrs ago. 2nd half of October it was cooling, and especially when you're in Ehime and Kagawa prefectures. I had a couple of days of rain...2 where it poured down all day. I brought a breathable rain jacket, but used it more for cold and wind protection. Best investment for rain protection was a 500yen transparent plastic umbrella available from any convenience store. Clothing wise I wore moisture wicking baselayers and shed layers if it got too hot.

    I just wore light trekking shoes, and changed socks if it got real bad. At the inns I used newspaper stuffed in side them to dry the shoes...another henro taught me this and inn owners stock old papers for this in most cases.

    Hope that helps.



    Shikoku Henro Trail
    Admin

    Posts : 213
    Join date : 2018-04-12
    Location : Chicago, USA

    Re: walking poles -vs- single pole

    Post by Shikoku Henro Trail on Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:27 am

    Originally posted by several members between 2011 and 2014.
    -----

    robmix

    « Reply #15 on: Jul 4th, 2011, 12:37am »
    Lisa, I also walked in Oct/Nov and the weather was incredible, not too hot, and not too cold. Even if there was a slight chill in the air in the early morning, by mid-morning it was warm enough to walk in a t-shirt, or a light long sleeve to keep the sun off. Apart from the typhoon which dumped serious rain on me for two days, I had one other day of torrential rain, and a few sprinkles here and there. I had a windbreaker, and an umbrella. The greatest thing I brought on the trip was a few space saver plastic bags, the kind you push all the air out of. . . saved a lot of space, and kept everything very dry. It was absolutely freezing at temple 66 !!!!

    =====

    Mathew Lucy

    « Reply #16 on: Jan 11th, 2012, 03:44am »
    Ya I agree there should be such signs like danger or anything. So that people could aware of this.

    =====

    daraohuiginnca

    « Reply #17 on: Jul 3rd, 2013, 06:36am »
    I used two Diamond carbon walking poles. They fold up and are stored most of the time but really are wonderful in the mountains. I also had kongotsue with me and just carried it on my pack when using the poles in the mountains. Not many people used poles but I find they make a big difference on the climbs.

    =====

    cpetersky

    « Reply #18 on: Mar 11th, 2014, 06:29am »
    My walking companion uses two poles, and it's a blessing for her. She has real balance issues -- worse than mine -- and downhill on mountain trails can be a slow go in any case. I'd shutter to think how slow she'd be without them. Per suggestion here, I printed out the traditional inscription for her, and she taped them on. Perfect.




      Current date/time is Sat Nov 17, 2018 5:33 pm