Pilgrimage On Shikoku Island

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    Should I not eat meat when I do my pilgrimage

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    Shikoku Henro Trail
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    Join date : 2018-04-12
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    Should I not eat meat when I do my pilgrimage

    Post by Shikoku Henro Trail on Sat Apr 14, 2018 7:32 am

    Originally posted by several members in October 2017.
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    Aprime

    « Thread started on: Oct 16th, 2017, 07:21am »
    As a Hindu I never eat meat if I am going to visit temple or have religious Hindu days

    Should I also do that while trying to do all 88 temples ?

    Thank you

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    Aprime

    « Reply #1 on: Oct 16th, 2017, 07:32am »
    I assume Kobo Daishi was vegetarian because if he was I don’t it would be right to eat meat then touch the stick as if his spirit is in the stick th n I feel that would be disrespecting it

    If someone can tell me if he was vegetarian that would be nice and also that include fish not that I really eat fish

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    tneva82

    « Reply #2 on: Oct 16th, 2017, 09:25am »
    Up to you. Japanese have rather loose system there. Indeed they have no monks like in other buddhist countries so priests get married etc unlike monks.

    Locals drink beer, eat meat etc. Temples offer beer and sashimi for those staying in lodging.

    As for Kukai who knows? It's been 1200 years and records were less complete than these days.

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    slc

    « Reply #3 on: Oct 16th, 2017, 12:48pm »
    I was fed a 100% vegetarian meal when I stayed in a temple at Mt. Koya, I assumed it was the same if you stayed at the temples on the route, but I could have been wrong. I ate a meal with a Buddhist 'priest' who was also walking the route, and he ate meat (and smoked cigarettes and drank sake/beer/whiskey). It's entirely up to you. I think it might be a little bit difficult. When you stay in a Minshuku you are fed the same meal as everybody else, and it usually includes fish/meat.

    The vast majority of pilgrims do eat meat on the journey from what I've seen.

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    Aprime

    « Reply #4 on: Oct 16th, 2017, 1:37pm »
    thank you

    I am visiting Japan this December but I am more looking forward to next summer as my supervisor authorised 7 weeks of next summer

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    tneva82

    « Reply #5 on: Oct 17th, 2017, 01:41am »
    on Oct 16th, 2017, 12:48pm, slc wrote:
    I was fed a 100% vegetarian meal when I stayed in a temple at Mt. Koya, I assumed it was the same if you stayed at the temples on the route, but I could have been wrong. I ate a meal with a Buddhist 'priest' who was also walking the route, and he ate meat (and smoked cigarettes and drank sake/beer/whiskey). It's entirely up to you. I think it might be a little bit difficult. When you stay in a Minshuku you are fed the same meal as everybody else, and it usually includes fish/meat.

    The vast majority of pilgrims do eat meat on the journey from what I've seen.



    Depends on the temple probably. On 26 at least we had sashimi. I remember that very well as rest of my table(we shared same meal from tons of food) was less of sashimi fan than I and when they noticed I loved it they told me to eat at will and noticing neighbour table was done with sashimi asked for it and gave that to me as well! I ate my stomach full of sashimi that night!

    And yeah if you are strict on no meat you probably need to ask for no meals and bring your own food. There's same food for all and without exception each meal had at least fish. And leaving food on table goes against japanese tradition so probably more polite to ask for no meal and bring your own than leave all the meat uneaten.

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    henrodon

    « Reply #6 on: Oct 22nd, 2017, 02:39am »
    As others have said, it's up to you. If you choose to go vegetarian, simply ask for a meal without meat or fish when you make reservations. As you probably know, you should make reservations in the morning at the latest, especially if you're going to have meals.

    Keep in mind, most soups and sauces here are made with fish, so strictly vegetarian food is practically unavailable unless you prepare all your own food. There are, of course, websites and Facebook groups by and for vegetarians that can give you advice about how to achieve your desired level of vegetarianism.





      Current date/time is Sat Nov 17, 2018 6:28 pm