Pilgrimage On Shikoku Island

Online forum for discussions related to the 88 temple pilgrimage on Shikoku, Japan.


    Should I purchase this if I'm travelling alone

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    Shikoku Henro Trail
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    Should I purchase this if I'm travelling alone

    Post by Shikoku Henro Trail on Sat Apr 14, 2018 7:26 am

    Originally posted by several members in August 2017.
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    Aprime

    « Thread started on: Aug 8th, 2017, 02:46am »
    http://www.mountainsafety.co.uk/Products-McMurdo-Fast-Find-Ranger-PLB-aspx

    In case I get lost or injured I mean how perilous could this journey be to do all the temples?

    Also what types of socks and hiking shoes should I bring or buy

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    tneva82

    « Reply #1 on: Aug 8th, 2017, 03:12am »
    on Aug 8th, 2017, 02:46am, Aprime wrote:
    http://www.mountainsafety.co.uk/Products-McMurdo-Fast-Find-Ranger-PLB-aspx

    In case I get lost or injured I mean how perilous could this journey be to do all the temples?

    Also what types of socks and hiking shoes should I bring or buy



    Sounds like an overkill especially outside summer period(summer being most likely most dangerous season due to extreme heat). Most of the time you are walking on public roads and towns so help is generally close. And frankly even mountain roads were generally safe enough(worst parts had even ropes to help you along!) so chance of say falling and injuring is pretty slim(plus especially during spring and likely fall there's generally other pilgrims behind you soon enough).

    Getting totally lost at the mountains isn't really worry(at least up to bangai 5/after temple 36). Generally one path to follow and more than enough path markers on crossroads so unless you are totally asleep for several crossings in a row you won't get lost badly enough that simply walking back isn't enough. Only times I got lost was on cities and those were generally "turn right next corner and you rejoin the main path" level of getting lost.

    (also not sure does that cover Japan or not)

    Do you have phone/internet access? With internet access skype is also usable which helps. That felt good enough safety catch for me.

    If you want to be REALLY safe guess buy it if you want but I would put that 220£ price tag and 170g(you want light bag to carry around) to better use. Pilgrimage is ridiculously safe one to walk. Biggest danger is likely going to be the tunnels! There ARE occasionally traffic accidents there up to lethal level with walking pilgrim and passing car on the narrow tunnels.

    As for socks and shoes one that you feel like walking a lot in asphalt though since you use public transportation for long distances that cuts down a LOT of asphalt walking. Are you going to climb all the mountains? If so with reduced asphalt walking def would go with medium hardness trekking shoes(a/b hardness) with good grip. I had those and they were nice on the mountain trails and definitely made them feel safe. Problem being them being heavy and bit tough less than ideal for asphalt walking but for you that's probably less of issue.

    For socks I like double layered system, thin interior socks and thicker outer sock. Helps reducing blisters.

    « Last Edit: Aug 8th, 2017, 03:14am by tneva82 »

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    Aprime

    « Reply #2 on: Aug 8th, 2017, 05:53am »
    I will have a phone and a pocket wifi instead of a sim as pocket has stronger wifi and I also have a cover for my phone for back up battery and spare chargers for my phone

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    Aprime

    « Reply #3 on: Aug 8th, 2017, 05:54am »
    Also I am travelling September 2018 to October 2018 plus I will use public transport for the longer temples

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    elindau

    « Reply #4 on: Aug 8th, 2017, 3:41pm »
    That really seems like overkill to me. Also why would you need a spare charger ... ?

    I wore North Face hiking shoes and was very happy with the choice.

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    Aprime

    « Reply #5 on: Aug 8th, 2017, 4:08pm »
    Spare battery I meant which is built into my phone case

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    tneva82

    « Reply #6 on: Aug 8th, 2017, 8:48pm »
    on Aug 8th, 2017, 05:54am, Aprime wrote:
    Also I am travelling September 2018 to October 2018 plus I will use public transport for the longer temples



    September can get you hit by a typhoon and still tad warm but not worst of it. Just check weather reports for any typhoon approaching! Good thing those don't come up unexpectedly.

    October meanwhile should be nice month weather wise. Not too hot, not too cold. You can probably be walking in t-shirt cheesy

    So I would say that's overkill. Never heard anybody having that and it's walked by couple thousand every year. And biggest danger I have found is being hit by a car and with those that's not exactly useful!

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    elindau

    « Reply #7 on: Aug 9th, 2017, 04:46am »
    on Aug 8th, 2017, 4:08pm, Aprime wrote:
    Spare battery I meant which is built into my phone case



    Oh I see.

    Here's my packing list, if it's helpful. You don't need the hydration system. I also never used my cold weather gear, but obviously you may still want to bring it. And I got lucky and never used my rain gear!!

    https://elizabethlindau.com/2017/03/09/pilgrimage-packing-list/

    « Last Edit: Aug 9th, 2017, 04:47am by elindau »

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    Aprime

    « Reply #8 on: Aug 9th, 2017, 04:52am »
    Thank you I saved your link for my holiday

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    tneva82

    « Reply #9 on: Aug 9th, 2017, 06:07am »
    on Aug 9th, 2017, 04:46am, elindau wrote:
    Oh I see.

    Here's my packing list, if it's helpful. You don't need the hydration system. I also never used my cold weather gear, but obviously you may still want to bring it. And I got lucky and never used my rain gear!!

    https://elizabethlindau.com/2017/03/09/pilgrimage-packing-list/



    I found hydration system useful myself(though think I'll go for 2l rather than 3l). Helps avoiding having to buy from vending machines all the time, makes easier to drink as one doesn't need to pull up bottle, drink, put back in but can drink as walking(especially handy on mountain paths cheesy At times I was half breathing, half drinking! wink

    Also you never are sure when you CAN find vending machines. I had couple parts where I found _no vending machines whatsoever_. (one was even on very hot day. I had water on my water bag but it ran out rather quickly and it was couple hours with no vending machines whatsoever. I only found one when I detoured out of the pilgrim path)

    edit: Fixed stupid typo. "dehydration system" indeed cheesy

    « Last Edit: Aug 9th, 2017, 06:27am by tneva82 »

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    Aprime

    « Reply #10 on: Aug 9th, 2017, 07:21am »
    Thank you very much

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    elindau

    « Reply #11 on: Aug 10th, 2017, 05:23am »
    Aprime is right - a hydration system will save money if you don't want to buy from vending machines.

    Personally I didn't want to over-hydrate, though, since I felt like often the bathrooms were few and far between!

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    Aprime

    « Reply #12 on: Aug 10th, 2017, 06:51am »
    I have to find out what exactly is a Hydration system is exactly and read the link

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    elindau

    « Reply #13 on: Aug 10th, 2017, 06:55am »
    It's the second item on my packing list.

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    Aprime


    « Reply #14 on: Aug 10th, 2017, 07:28am »
    Thanks


    Shikoku Henro Trail
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    Re: Should I purchase this if I'm travelling alone

    Post by Shikoku Henro Trail on Sat Apr 14, 2018 7:28 am

    Originally posted by several members in October 2017.
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    henrodon

    « Reply #15 on: Oct 22nd, 2017, 02:57am »
    I agree with the others -- you don't need the rescue beacon. If you have an emergency, it's FAR more likely to be on a road than on one of the relatively few real mountain trails, and you're never alone, especially after about mid-September when lots of people take to the path.

    As for a hydration system, why not just take a couple of water bottles? Hydration systems are great if you want/need to sip as you go. I really prefer to rest at least five minutes per hour, which gives me lots of chances to stay hydrated. Also, I usually take sports drink, which you can buy in granular form in packets that make up one liter. If you put that in a hydration system, it will probably affect the taste of water in the system for a long time, which you may not always want to taste. The usual hydration fluid brands here are Pocari Sweat and Aquarius. You can buy them in cans and plastic bottles in most vending machines and in packets in grocery stores, drug stores, and convenience stores.

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    tneva82

    « Reply #16 on: Oct 22nd, 2017, 12:26pm »
    on Oct 22nd, 2017, 02:57am, henrodon wrote:
    As for a hydration system, why not just take a couple of water bottles? Hydration systems are great if you want/need to sip as you go. I really prefer to rest at least five minutes per hour, which gives me lots of chances to stay hydrated. Also, I usually take sports drink, which you can buy in granular form in packets that make up one liter. If you put that in a hydration system, it will probably affect the taste of water in the system for a long time, which you may not always want to taste. The usual hydration fluid brands here are Pocari Sweat and Aquarius. You can buy them in cans and plastic bottles in most vending machines and in packets in grocery stores, drug stores, and convenience stores.



    I prefer to drink more often than once an hour so having drink available all the time without pulling up from backback all the time is time saver. And most of the time I'm drinking water. Sport drink is good but drinking 2-3 liters of that per day gets me cheesy I usually have half a liter of those in my henro bag and that covers me for sport drink section apart from very hot days.

    Also having most of drinks on my backbag rather than say henro bag allows that weight be less issue. The more weight I have on backbag rather than elsewhere in my body the better. That way the weight bothers the strongest, most suitable for heavy lifting, part of the body. Loins!

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    daraohuiginnca

    « Reply #17 on: Oct 22nd, 2017, 6:04pm »
    No need. Just wear trail runners such as Saucony or my preferred Altra Lone Peak 3.0. The journey is mostly on paved or hard trails. Even in the mountains the trails are fairly straightforward. The idea of hiking boots is really silly in my view. Biggest thing is to have great foot padding and I sugggest well padded hiking socks - lots of them.
    IF you have a limit on time I suggest avoiding teh general obsession of walking every step and hopping through some urban areas. You can save about ten days of city walking if you plan well but others do not mind that and have the time. One couple was very worried about finishing but once they realized they could hop through about 50Kms of city they settled down and had a more pleasurable time.

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    daraohuiginnca

    « Reply #18 on: Oct 22nd, 2017, 6:07pm »
    A rescue beacon is absolutly not needed. You are always on marked trail and even in the mountain parts it is very clearly routed. Only caution is on the peak before 88 where you must heed the sign and not go down the right route. The sign in Japanese says -- THIS IS NOT THE WAY! so pay attention. You can save a lot of money if you just have a couple of water bottles and fill them up instead of spending on Pcari at every turn. HYDRATION IS A MAJOR RISK AS IS SUN STROKE so pay attention and drink a lot of water.



      Current date/time is Sat Nov 17, 2018 5:54 pm