Pilgrimage On Shikoku Island

Online forum for discussions related to the 88 temple pilgrimage on Shikoku, Japan.


    If my dad and I use a car to do the pilgrimage

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    Shikoku Henro Trail
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    If my dad and I use a car to do the pilgrimage

    Post by Shikoku Henro Trail on Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:14 pm

    Originally posted by several members in February and March 2018.
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    Aprime

    « Thread started on: Feb 18th, 2018, 6:25pm »
    My dad wants to come with me and I want to do it with my dad

    I haven’t done it before and I guess I can do it another time. by myself

    If I rent a car do we have the walk far from the car as my dad can walk and stuff but not 5 -10 Miles a day

    Do we have park the car a distance too far from the temples ?

    Also I am thinking of doing the 20 extra temples ? but I do feel embarrassed to buy the henro clothes although I wanted to when I was travelling by myself but I feel like a hypocrite driving around in a vehicle and doing the pilgrimage but I feel I should wear the religious clothes

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    Aprime

    « Reply #1 on: Feb 18th, 2018, 6:28pm »
    Also since we have 2 sets of luggage it would make more sense as well as with all respect my father would slow me down walking wise

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    Aprime

    « Reply #2 on: Feb 18th, 2018, 6:56pm »
    Or maybe even use bikes but I ain’t very good, how long would that take and would I put my backpack on the back and tie it up ?

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    henrodon

    « Reply #3 on: Feb 19th, 2018, 04:16am »
    Thousands of henro travel by car and wear pilgrim clothes. They are just as much pilgrims as anyone else. Some temples have parking 500 meters or so away, sometimes downhill from the temple. BUT — have you driven on Shikoku, especially up in the mountains? It’s challenging, to say the least.

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    Aprime

    « Reply #4 on: Feb 19th, 2018, 05:58am »
    Never driven in japan but being from England we do drive on the left

    How long should I rent a car for for 88 temples and 88 temples plus the other 20 so we can decide

    Thank you

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    tneva82

    « Reply #5 on: Feb 22nd, 2018, 11:20pm »
    on Feb 19th, 2018, 05:58am, Aprime wrote:
    Never driven in japan but being from England we do drive on the left

    How long should I rent a car for for 88 temples and 88 temples plus the other 20 so we can decide

    Thank you



    The issue isn't just left side. The streets are narrow. Super narrow. Especially mountain ones where it can be challenge with opposite going cars at which point even walkers needs to take care(been there). Definitely take things carefully. How is your japanese? Not sure how english supporting navigators there are there. Especially at shikoku.

    As for time think 10 days or so is fairly standard for car, maybe 2 weeks. Maybe day or two more for bangai temples and then few more just in case.

    And don't worry about not being proper pilgrim by using car. Good enough for locals, good enough for you smiley sounds like better plan than walking with dad if he doesn't feel he can do it on foot.

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    Aprime

    « Reply #6 on: Feb 23rd, 2018, 12:14am »
    Sorry but what is a mountain road ?, is there two lanes or what ?

    Now I am worried as I don’t want to die or something ? When you say that I am thinking my car rolls off the mountain and I hope I got the wrong meaning ?

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    tneva82

    « Reply #7 on: Feb 23rd, 2018, 09:06am »
    on Feb 23rd, 2018, 12:14am, Aprime wrote:
    Sorry but what is a mountain road ?, is there two lanes or what ?

    Now I am worried as I don’t want to die or something ? When you say that I am thinking my car rolls off the mountain and I hope I got the wrong meaning ?



    Well generally not THAT bad but maybb 1.5-1.7 lanes at times. And with steep curves it can be tough to drive around. Or at least that was impression i got for example at temple 27 watching 2 cars trying to pass each other. Took lots of care and reverse gear used a lot on the curve. And they had to use walker's area as well so i had to wait as well.

    Small car recommended!

    But they do have railings so provided you don't drive like crazy no rolling off mountain. Just drive carefully!

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    Tominrm

    « Reply #8 on: Mar 3rd, 2018, 8:51pm »
    I am not sure if Aprime is still interested, but in my experience, I saw most pilgrims coming in groups on buses. Pilgrims on foot are there but not nearly as many as other methods of pilgrimage like bus, car, or scooter.

    If you are familiar with El Camino de Santiago, I think this pilgrimage about visiting all 88 temples and Mt. Koya and going through the ritual rather than walking.

    Most people wear pilgrim's attire no matter how they arrive at temples.

    « Last Edit: Mar 3rd, 2018, 8:52pm by Tominrm »

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    Aprime

    « Reply #9 on: Mar 4th, 2018, 02:16am »
    I don’t know about bus tours but whether they go to all 88 and roughly go when I want to go

    I got a price for a custom camper van for 15 days where I can sleep in it for 100,000 yen which I think is a good price

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    Jmolnar

    « Reply #10 on: Mar 4th, 2018, 04:01am »
    Never been to Britain, but one thing that stuck with me about Japanese rural roads (being American) is that many of them have no guard rails, many are elevated and have deep concrete dropoffs/gutters on the sides, as well as being narrow. The "mountain" roads do have guardrails at the most dangerous places, if they're well used roads (most temple roads are). I'd suggest watching some videos of non-highway (rural) roads in Japan to at least get an idea of what you're in for. You already have the primary problem solved of driving on the left (for most people).

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    Shikoku Henro Trail

    « Reply #11 on: Mar 4th, 2018, 3:09pm »
    Given that the price for a night in a minshuku is about 7,000 yen per person, with your father you'd be paying 14,000 yen per night in paid lodging. By that standard the camper van will be about half price. A very good deal.

    But, you will be on your own for meals and I admit the meals at minshuku are part of what I really look forward to each time I go to Shikoku.

    Dave

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    Aprime

    « Reply #12 on: Mar 4th, 2018, 4:59pm »
    Thanks Dave and with my Shikoku book written by David MORETON I hope to be okay

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    Shikoku Henro Trail

    « Reply #13 on: Mar 5th, 2018, 06:15am »
    Just making sure.....

    By "my Shikoku book written by David MORETON," you mean the guidebook "Shikoku Japan 88 Route Guide." Correct?

    I only ask because David didn't write it, yet that is the book you have to have when you go.

    Dave

    « Last Edit: Mar 5th, 2018, 06:15am by Shikoku Henro Trail »

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    Aprime

    « Reply #14 on: Mar 5th, 2018, 06:46am »
    Wonderful I am thinking of going tomorrow dogo Onsen and places like .

    I can thinking how long I should need it for to be honest as I don’t want to rush my experience but I don’t either want to finish too early either .


    Shikoku Henro Trail
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    Re: If my dad and I use a car to do the pilgrimage

    Post by Shikoku Henro Trail on Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:16 pm

    Originally posted by several members in February and March 2018.
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    tneva82

    « Reply #15 on: Mar 5th, 2018, 08:28am »
    on Mar 4th, 2018, 3:09pm, Shikoku Henro Trail wrote:
    Given that the price for a night in a minshuku is about 7,000 yen per person, with your father you'd be paying 14,000 yen per night in paid lodging. By that standard the camper van will be about half price. A very good deal.

    But, you will be on your own for meals and I admit the meals at minshuku are part of what I really look forward to each time I go to Shikoku.

    Dave



    Another issue being size. Could be tricky at times on those narrow lanes making sure no part gets hit

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    Shikoku Henro Trail

    I drove a van on the island for about a month one time. I was amazed at how narrow some of the roads were. In fact, one time I was driving right down the middle of the road, completely safe, when all of the sudden one of the guard rails jumped out and side-swiped my fender. I was shocked. Didn't know they could move. Like I said, of course I was right in the middle of the road and completely not at fault. Shocked, I tell you...

    Will never drive on Shikoku again.

    Smile

    Dave



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